How To Cure Pile

This fruit known as bush banana or Uvaria chamae can help you cure your pile instantly !

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Medicinal Uses

The root and root-bark have a widespread reputation in traditional medicine in Africa.
The plant has been shown to contain several medically active compounds – the root bark yields an oleo-resin; alkaloids are present in small amount in the roots; tannins have been recorded as present but saponins have been recorded as absent.

  1. The root bark is antiinflammatory, astringent, febrifuge, galactagogue and styptic.
  2.  It is taken internally in the treatment of catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membranes; bronchitis and gonorrhoea.
  3. It is also used in the treatment of dysentery; as a specific treatment for piles; epistaxis, haematuria, haematemesis and haemoptysis.
  4.  It is mixed with Guinea grains (Piper guinense) then added to food as a useful treatment for menorrhagia.
  5.  It is boiled with spices and the decoction drunk in the treatment of fevers that are classed locally as ‘yellow-fever’, including almost any indisposition that is accompanied by jaundice.
  6. The root is said to be febrifuge, purgative, stomachic and vermifuge. It is boiled with spices and the decoction drunk in the treatment of fevers that are classed locally as ‘yellow-fever’, including almost any indisposition that is accompanied by jaundice.
  7.  The root is also considered to be a ‘woman’s medicine’ and is used to treat amenorrhoea, to prevent miscarriage; and to relieve the pains of childbirth.
  8. The root is made into a drink and is also used as a body-wash for treating oedematous conditions.
  9. Severe abdominal pain is treated by a root-infusion combined with native pepper in gin; whilst the root combined with Guinea grains (probably Piper guinense) is used in an application to the fontanelle for cerebral diseases.
  10. The roots are used externally for healing sores. The sap from the root and stem is applied to wounds.
  11. The crushed root, combined with Capsicum or other rubefacient substances, is rubbed on as a local counter-irritant.
  12. The leaves and roots are macerated together for internal use as a cough mixture, and when mixed with those of Annona senegalensis, then dried and pulverized, are considered strong medicine for renal and costal pain.
  13. The sap of the leaves, roots and stems is widely used on wounds and sores and is said to promote rapid healing.
  14. A leaf-infusion is used as an eyewash and a leaf-decoction as a febrifuge.
  15. All parts of the plant are fragrant. The plant is used to make a pomade

Credits: Tropical.thefern.info

 

 

 

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